Vaucresson Sausage Company returns after Katrina

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Nearly two decades in the making, a historic New Orleans family business is reopening its doors. The Vaucresson Sausage Company was heavily impacted by Hurricane Katrina. The family is now back and ready to help Seventh Ward families just in time for the holidays. “We’re going to have our famous Creole cherry hot sausage, which is a Creole hot sausage, we’ll have some other offerings, jerk chicken sausage, grilled chicken sausage, we’re going to have crawfish sausages,” said Vance Vaucresson, third generation butcher. His grandfather started the family business and his father continued the tradition. “We have our roots in life, as well as in business here in the South Quarter for over 122 years,” Vaucresson said. Like many businesses affected by Hurricane Katrina, they had to close and find a way to rebuild. “What Catriona did that was so unique was a clean slate for everyone. So for that area in particular, it was a ghost town for a long time,” Vaucresson said. sure he would never come back. Once the family had the money, it was time to reopen. “We decided to put in a cafe deli, a place that in this neighborhood has always been known for common spaces, places where people come, see their neighbors, see their family, and all that, and maybe in the community,” Vaucresson said. The family business goes beyond sausage. They are also passionate about helping their community. That’s why they’re invested in affordable housing for Seventh Ward families. The family invested in a property that would primarily be affordable housing. “Sixty percent of it is affordable for 30 years and has allowed a number of people to come back and ask for affordable housing, and seniors to come back and have a place in their neighborhood where they can afford to live. it’s very important,” Vaucresson said. Vaucresson hopes it preserves the history of the town and his family’s name. hits their palette that you’ll never forget when they come back, they must come back to see us,” Vaucresson said.The official grand opening is Friday, November 25.

Nearly two decades in the making, a historic New Orleans family business is reopening its doors.

The Vaucresson Sausage Company was heavily impacted by Hurricane Katrina. The family is now back and ready to help Seventh Ward families just in time for the holidays.

“We’re going to have our famous Creole cherry hot sausage, which is a Creole hot sausage, we’ll have some other offerings, jerk chicken sausage, grilled chicken sausage, we’re going to have crawfish sausages,” said Vance Vaucresson, third generation butcher.

His grandfather started the family business and his father continued the tradition.

“We have our roots in life, as well as in business here in the South Quarter for over 122 years,” Vaucresson said.

Like many businesses affected by Hurricane Katrina, they had to close and find a way to rebuild.

“What Catriona did that was so unique was a clean slate for everyone. So for that area in particular, it was a ghost town for a long time,” Vaucresson said.

Vaucresson said the company has been hit financially and he’s not sure it will ever return.

Once the family had the money, it was time to reopen.

“We decided to put in a cafe deli, a place that in this neighborhood has always been known for common spaces, places where people come, see their neighbors, see their family, and all that, and maybe in the community,” Vaucresson said.

The family business goes beyond sausage. They are also passionate about helping their community. That’s why they’re invested in affordable housing for Seventh Ward families.

The family invested in a property that would primarily be affordable housing.

“Sixty percent of it is affordable for 30 years and has allowed a number of people to come back and ask for affordable housing, and seniors to come back and have a place in their neighborhood where they can afford to live. that’s very important,” said Vaucresson.

Vaucresson hopes this will preserve the town’s history and his family’s name.

“We want visitors to come in and understand that our culture isn’t just about the words telling the story, but once it hits their palette, you’ll never forget when they come back, they have to come back and we see,” Vaucresson said.

The official grand opening is Friday, November 25.

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